Build Your Leaders

Archive for the ‘trends’ Category

What Women Say It Takes to Succeed

December 3rd, 2012

Smart companies are waking up to the unique skills that women bring to the workplace. Not only are women smart, many have an empathetic communications style that makes them natural leaders.

The international staffing agency Randstad recently conducted a survey on women’s insights and perspectives on work and employee engagement. In this report, respondents ranked “flexibility” and “adaptability” as top skills needed to succeed in today’s workplace. In fact, more than 51 percent reported these skill-sets as the top two most important, followed by knowledge of technology” (37 percent) and teamwork (35 percent).

Do you agree?

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Employers Beware!

October 24th, 2012

Most employers don’t have a clue how vulnerable they really are.

I follow the Herman Group, futurists out of Greensboro, NC, and for the past several years they’ve been predicting a large impending employee turnover. Now, they claim it’s going to happen next quarter.

The conditions are perfect: a recovering United States economy, increasing job growth, and unhappy employees.

Others agree with The Herman Group. A just released 2012 Aflac WorkForces Report indicates that 49 percent of workers are “at least somewhat likely to look for a job this year”. In addition, 50 percent of workers say employee benefits are “very or extremely influential on decision to leave”. Most of the people who intend to leave describe themselves as “top talent”. These men and women are the kind of workers companies can’t afford to lose.

The employment market is flipping, and most talented employees will be in the driver’s seat once again.

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Balance Work with Home

September 24th, 2009

Work and personal life out of balance? You’re not alone. Those of you who know me, know that I love to follow trends. One futurist I follow is Roger Herman of the Herman Group. Herman and his partner Joyce Gioia specialize in employee retention and offer a free weekly eNewsletter that I subscribe to, http://www.hermangroup.com/futurespeak/e-advisories.htmlherman.

Herman believes – and I concur – that money is no longer the chief motivator in getting job candidates to sign on the dotted line. “Maintaining balance between work and personal lives is rapidly becoming one of the primary motivators for today’s workers. Balance has already surfaced as an important criterion for people choosing their next employer.” The focus is now on “softer issues” like professional development, being involved in decision making, childcare, and finding meaning in one’s work. Chief among these issues is work-life balance.

Many of my clients struggle with work-life balance. Upon questioning them, I find that many of their challenges are self-inflicted. It’s not so much the company’s expectations of them, as their expectations of themselves. Smart employers know they can increase employee retention rates by being sensitive to life balance.

I empathize with my clients’ struggle for balance. “I should be doing something productive,” my inner critic whispers. And with Blackberries, cell phones, and e-mail, it’s too easy to stay connected with work during down times.

I sure don’t have the solution, but I have found that if I schedule time to do the things I enjoy, I make time for them. For example, every Tuesday morning (when I’m not out of town) I used to attend a painting group at A-B Tech in Asheville. For three hours, I would have nothing to do but paint. Today, I have a studio, and I still have to schedule time on my calender to be there. For me it is time well spent, as those three hours help ground me through the week.

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A Peak at The Future

September 8th, 2009

Some predictions for the workplace. Those of you who know me, know that I love to follow trends. One futurist I follow is Joyce Gioia of the Herman Group.

The Herman Group specializes in employee retention and offer a free weekly eNewsletter that I subscribe to.

Here are several of her observations:

“A stronger influence of women in societal leadership positions will shift our cultural orientation from confrontation and competition to more cooperation and collaboration.

Women who are acculturated to build and nurture relationships will be more successful than the traditional males who have been taught to compete and ‘win at all costs.’

In the longer term, the need for human-to-human interaction will reassert itself. We anticipate a rebellion against voice mail and e-mail used as screens, excuses for people to actually communicate with each other.

New career designs will emerge as people change jobs and occupations every two to four years. Mid-career retirements, also known as sabbaticals, will replace the end-of-career retirement for a large percentage of workers. An increasing number of people will work from home, operating their own businesses, tele-commuting, or under contract to one or more employers. Geographic distance between employer and worker will become much less important.”

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